Cape bushbuck

Females hide their young and eat the feces after nursing them, so no trail of their scents remains to entice predators

Nick Borrow

Predominantly found in the dense forests and thickets of sub-Saharan Africa, the Cape Bushbuck has carved out a niche that allows it to thrive in environments rich in cover and close to water sources. This proximity to water is not just a preference but a testament to the Bushbuck’s remarkable ability as a swimmer. Capable of crossing water bodies as wide as three kilometers, the Bushbuck showcases a level of adaptability and skill that few other antelopes possess. Even in times of water scarcity, these animals have evolved to survive on the dew collected by foliage, illustrating their remarkable resilience.

Despite their widespread presence and adaptability, Cape Bushbucks navigate a complex relationship with the expanding footprint of human activity. While they have shown a remarkable capacity to coexist with human settlements, often venturing into gardens and farms in search of food, this interaction is not without its challenges. In certain areas, their foraging habits have led to them being considered pests, prompting efforts by local communities and authorities to control their populations.

While the Cape Bushbuck’s numbers are currently stable, making them one of the most common types of antelopes in their range, their future is not guaranteed. The relentless expansion of human settlements, alongside the growth of agricultural lands and the development of roads, poses a significant threat to their habitats. These changes not only reduce the available space for Bushbucks to roam and feed but also fragment their habitats, making it increasingly difficult for them to access traditional water sources and forage areas.

Distribution

Country
Population est.
Status
Year
Comments
Angola
2016
Benin
2016
Botswana
2016
Burkina Faso
2016
Burundi
2016
Cameroon
2016
Central Af. Rep.
2016
Chad
2016
Congo-Brazzaville
2016
Côte D’ivoire
2016
DR Congo (Kinshasa)
2016
Equatorial Guinea
2016
Eswatini
2016
Ethiopia
2016
Gabon
2016
Gambia
2016
Ghana
2016
Guinea-Bissau
2016
Guinea
2016
Kenya
2016
Lesotho
2016
Possibly Extinct
Liberia
2016
Malawi
2016
Mali
2016
Mauritania
2016
Mozambique
2016
Namibia
2016
Niger
2016
Nigeria
2016
Rwanda
2016
Senegal
2016
Sierra Leone
2016
Somalia
2016
South Africa
2016
South Sudan
2016
Sudan
2016
Tanzania
2016
Togo
2016
Uganda
2016
Zambia
2016
Zimbabwe
2016

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Terrestrial / Aquatic

Altricial / Precocial

Polygamous / Monogamous

Dimorphic (size) / Monomorphic

Active: Diurnal / Nocturnal

Social behavior: Solitary / Pack / Herd

Diet: Carnivore / Herbivore / Omnivore / Piscivorous / Insectivore

Migratory: Yes / No

Domesticated: Yes / No

Dangerous: Yes / No