Ringed caecilian

They do not just look like snakes, but they might also be able to deliver a nasty bite

Andreas Schlüter

These legless creatures, often mistaken for snakes due to their elongated bodies, play a unique role in the ecosystems of tropical regions across Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Among their notable distinctions, Ringed caecilians are recognized as the first caecilian species to possess oral venom glands, contributing to their intriguing ecological roles.

Ringed caecilians are primarily carnivorous, with tiny insects and worms comprising their primary food sources. Their specialized adaptations, such as their burrowing behavior and sensory tentacles, aid them in locating and capturing their prey efficiently. Their subterranean lifestyle, including the creation of self-made tunnels, sets them apart from many other amphibians and underscores their unique ecological niche.

In South America, Ringed caecilians find their home in a variety of habitats, including the open savanna of Caatinga and wooded areas with moist soils. This adaptability to different environments reflects their ability to thrive in diverse ecological settings.

As of the present, the conservation status of the Ringed caecilian is classified as “least concern.” This designation suggests that their populations are relatively stable and not currently facing immediate threats of extinction. However, ongoing habitat preservation and monitoring efforts are essential to ensure the long-term survival of this unique amphibian species.

Distribution

Country
Population est.
Status
Year
Comments
Argentina
2013
Bolivia
2013
Brazil
2013
Colombia
2013
Ecuador
2013
French Guiana
2013
Peru
2013
Venezuela
2013

Anything we've missed?

Help us improve this page by suggesting edits. Glory never dies!

Suggest an edit

Get to know me

Terrestrial / Aquatic

Altricial / Precocial

Polygamous / Monogamous

Dimorphic (size) / Monomorphic

Active: Diurnal / Nocturnal

Social behavior: Solitary / Pack / Herd

Diet: Carnivore / Herbivore / Omnivore / Piscivorous / Insectivore

Migratory: Yes / No

Domesticated: Yes / No

Dangerous: Yes / No