Common warthog

Widely distributed and the only pigs that live in grasslands

Assaf Levy

Common warthogs are recognizable by two pairs of tusks that protrude from the mouth and are curved upwards. The lower pair is shorter than the upper pair and becomes sharp by grinding against the upper pair as the mouth opens and closes. These tusks are used for combating other hogs or defense against predators, as the lower pair can cause significant damage.

Armed with patches of thick growth skin on the face to act as padding when males fight during mating season, they have a large head with a mane running down the spine until the middle of the back and sparse hair that are black or brown. When running in alarm, they raise their talks like flags.

Although labeled as ‘Least concern,’ their numbers decrease mainly from drought, disease, and hunting.

Distribution

Country
Population est.
Status
Year
Comments
Angola
2016
Benin
2016
Botswana
2016
Burkina Faso
2016
Burundi
2016
Cameroon
2016
Central Af. Rep.
2016
Chad
2016
Congo-Brazzaville
2016
Possibly Extinct
Côte D’ivoire
2016
DR Congo (Kinshasa)
2016
Djibouti
2016
Eritrea
2016
Eswatini
2016
Ethiopia
2016
Gabon
2016
Gambia
2016
Ghana
2016
Guinea-Bissau
2016
Guinea
2016
Kenya
2016
Liberia
2016
Malawi
2016
Mali
2016
Mauritania
2016
Mozambique
2016
Namibia
2016
Niger
2016
Nigeria
2016
Rwanda
2016
Senegal
2016
Sierra Leone
2016
South Africa
2016
South Sudan
2016
Sudan
2016
Tanzania
2016
Togo
2016
Uganda
2016
Zambia
2016
Zimbabwe
2016

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Terrestrial / Aquatic

Altricial / Precocial

Polygamous / Monogamous

Dimorphic (size) / Monomorphic

Active: Diurnal / Nocturnal

Social behavior: Solitary / Pack / Herd

Diet: Carnivore / Herbivore / Omnivore / Piscivorous / Insectivore

Migratory: Yes / No

Domesticated: Yes / No

Dangerous: Yes / No