Great roundleaf bat

A key player in keeping pesky insect populations in check and lending a hand in pollination

Rajesh Puttaswamaiah

Notably distinguished by its leaf-shaped nose-leaf, this bat’s adaptation enhances its echolocation and hunting prowess. With an impressive wingspan of up to 18 in (1.5 ft), the great roundleaf bat gracefully navigates the darkness, utilizing its acute auditory senses to track down flying insects, including moths, beetles, and spiders.

As the sun yields to the moon, it emerges from its roost, commencing its quest for sustenance. It congregates in colonies by day, often sheltering in caves, abandoned structures, or hollow trees. These communal roosts offer a window into the complexities of social dynamics within the bat world. Despite its captivating attributes, the species faces challenges such as habitat loss and diseases, which underscore the significance of its role in regulating insect populations and ecosystem balance.

Distribution

Country
Population est.
Status
Year
Comments
Cambodia
2018
China
2018
Hong Kong
2018
India
2018
Laos
2018
Malaysia
2018
Myanmar
2018
Nepal
2018
Taiwan
2018
Thailand
2018
Vietnam
2018

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Terrestrial / Aquatic

Altricial / Precocial

Polygamous / Monogamous

Dimorphic (size) / Monomorphic

Active: Diurnal / Nocturnal

Social behavior: Solitary / Pack / Herd / Colony

Diet: Carnivore / Herbivore / Omnivore / Piscivorous / Insectivore

Migratory: Yes / No

Domesticated: Yes / No

Dangerous: Yes / No