Trident bat

Highly mobile bats that tend to roost in hundreds to thousands of whatever shelters they can find

Jorge Láscar

The most significant appearance of the trident bat is its nose-leaf that resembles a trident, where the outer two projections are blunted, and the central one is pointed. They have two color phases; the first is pale grey-brown, and the second is pale orange-brown with a whitish underside. They also have pale faces and large ears.

Their diets consist of beetles, ants, bees, wasps, butterflies, moths, crickets, and grasshoppers, which makes them insectivorous bats. Trident bat is very successful in preying on butterflies and moths due to their agility. Trident bats’ offspring, known as pups, are relatively large at birth, weighing up to 30% of their mother’s weight. Pups latch to the nipple of their mother for the first two to three days after birth; on the third or fourth day, mothers leave their pups at the roost so they can forage for food.

Distribution

Country
Population est.
Status
Year
Comments
Afghanistan
2016
Algeria
2016
Burkina Faso
2016
Chad
2016
Djibouti
2016
Egypt
2016
Eritrea
2016
Ethiopia
2016
Gambia
2016
Iran
2016
Iraq
2016
Presence Uncertain
Israel
2016
Kuwait
2016
Presence Uncertain
Lebanon
2016
Presence Uncertain
Libya
2016
Mali
2016
Mauritania
2016
Morocco
2016
Niger
2016
Oman
2016
Pakistan
2016
Qatar
2016
Presence Uncertain
Saudi Arabia
2016
Senegal
2016
Somalia
2016
Sudan
2016
Syria
2016
Tunisia
2016
UAE
2016
Presence Uncertain
Yemen
2016

Anything we've missed?

Help us improve this page by suggesting edits. Glory never dies!

Suggest an edit

Get to know me

Terrestrial / Aquatic

Altricial / Precocial

Polygamous / Monogamous

Dimorphic (size) / Monomorphic

Active: Diurnal / Nocturnal

Social behavior: Solitary / Pack / Herd / Colony

Diet: Carnivore / Herbivore / Omnivore / Piscivorous / Insectivore

Migratory: Yes / No

Domesticated: Yes / No

Dangerous: Yes / No