Common crane

The flocks of this social and gregarious bird are fond of migration, flying over the horizon and creating a V-shaped formation

Вых Пыхманн

Characterized by its elegant grey plumage and distinctive red crown, it is a majestic bird often spotted in wetlands, marshes, and other aquatic habitats. Renowned for its extensive migrations, common cranes traverse vast distances in cohesive groups, following well-established flyways that span continents. These migratory journeys play a crucial role in the species’ lifecycle, allowing them to access vital breeding and wintering grounds while also ensuring genetic diversity and population connectivity across their range.

Despite their graceful appearance, common cranes are opportunistic feeders with a diverse diet that reflects their adaptability to various habitats. From probing and picking behavior observed during foraging on land to wading in shallow waters in search of aquatic prey, these birds are known to consume a wide range of food items. Their diet typically includes plants in various stages of growth, invertebrates such as insects and worms, and small vertebrates like snakes and rodents, demonstrating their versatility as omnivorous feeders.

Unfortunately, common cranes face numerous threats in their habitats, with hunting being a significant concern. The species’ large size and distinctive calls make them targets for hunters seeking their meat, feathers, or simply the thrill of the hunt. Additionally, habitat loss and degradation due to human activities, including agriculture, urbanization, and infrastructure development, further compound the challenges faced by common cranes and other wetland-dependent species.

The vocalizations of common cranes, characterized by loud, high-pitched calls that carry over long distances, serve various functions in their social and ecological interactions. While these calls play a crucial role in communication within crane flocks, helping individuals coordinate movements, warn of potential threats, and maintain social cohesion, they can also attract unwanted attention from predators and human disturbances. Despite the risks associated with their vocalizations, the unique calls of common cranes are a defining feature of wetland ecosystems and contribute to the rich tapestry of sounds found in these habitats.

Distribution

Country
Population est.
Status
Year
Comments
Afghanistan
2016
Passage
Albania
2016
Algeria
2016
Armenia
2016
Austria
0
Official estimate
EX
2016
Extinct locally
Azerbaijan
2016
Bahrain
2016
Passage
Bangladesh
2016
Belarus
2016
Belgium
2016
Passage
Bhutan
2016
Bosnia And Herz.
2016
Bulgaria
2016
Canada
2016
Vagrant
China
2016
Croatia
2016
Cyprus
2016
Passage
Czechia
35 pairs
Official estimate
LC
2016
Breeding
Denmark
750 pairs
Official estimate
LC
2016
Djibouti
2016
Vagrant
Egypt
2016
Eritrea
2016
Estonia
5,800 pairs
Official estimate
LC
2016
Ethiopia
2016
Faroe Islands
2016
Vagrant
Finland
40,000 pairs
Official estimate
LC
2016
France
20 pairs
Official estimate
LC
2016
Georgia
2016
Germany
10,000 pairs
Official estimate
LC
2016
Gibraltar
2016
Vagrant
Greece
2016
Hong Kong
2016
Vagrant
Hungary
2016
Iceland
2016
Vagrant
India
2016
Iran
2016
Non-Breeding
Iraq
2016
Non-Breeding
Ireland
2016
Vagrant
Israel
2016
Italy
2016
Japan
2016
Jordan
2016
Kazakhstan
2016
Breeding
Korea
2016
Kuwait
2016
Non-Breeding
Kyrgyzstan
2016
Passage
Laos
2016
Latvia
2016
Lebanon
2016
Passage
Libya
2016
Liechtenstein
2016
Vagrant
Lithuania
2016
Luxembourg
2016
Malta
2016
Mauritania
2016
Vagrant
Moldova
2016
Passage
Mongolia
2016
Breeding
Montenegro
2016
Morocco
2016
Myanmar
2016
Non-Breeding
Nepal
2016
Netherlands
2016
Niger
2016
Vagrant
Nigeria
2016
Vagrant
North Korea
2016
North Macedonia
2016
Non-Breeding
Norway
5,000 pairs
Official estimate
LC
2016
Breeding
Oman
2016
Pakistan
2016
Poland
22,000
Official estimate
LC
2016
Portugal
2016
Non-Breeding
Qatar
2016
Vagrant
Romania
2016
Russia
2016
Breeding
Saudi Arabia
2016
Passage
Serbia
2016
Slovakia
2016
Non-Breeding
Slovenia
2016
Spain
2016
Sudan
2016
Non-Breeding
Svalbard
2016
Vagrant
Sweden
30,000 pairs
Official estimate
LC
2016
Switzerland
2016
Syria
2016
Tajikistan
2016
Tunisia
2016
Non-Breeding
Turkey
2016
Turkmenistan
2016
UAE
2016
Non-Breeding
Ukraine
2016
United Kingdom
2016
United States
2016
Vagrant
Uzbekistan
2016
Vietnam
2016
Yemen
2016
Non-Breeding

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Terrestrial / Aquatic

Altricial / Precocial

Polygamous / Monogamous

Dimorphic (size) / Monomorphic

Active: Diurnal / Nocturnal

Social behavior: Solitary / Pack / Herd / Flock

Diet: Carnivore / Herbivore / Omnivore / Piscivorous / Insectivore

Migratory: Yes / No

Domesticated: Yes / No

Dangerous: Yes / No