Gray fox

While still widespread throughout North & Central America, habitat loss and deforestation allowed the red fox to become more dominant

California Department of Water Resources

The gray fox appears very similar to the widespread red fox and resembles a domestic housecat. But it has a black tail tip compared to the white tail tip of the red fox. Gray foxes are excellent tree climbers and prefer to live in deciduous forests scattered with woodland areas.

Gray foxes are plentiful throughout their habitats in North America and have no special conservation status. Although they are sometimes trapped or hunted by humans for their fur, there does not seem to be any immediate risk to their population and future survival.

Gray foxes play a vital role in ecological homeostasis by controlling the number of small rodents and countless insects.

Distribution

Country
Population est.
Status
Year
Comments
Belize
2016
Canada
2016
Colombia
2016
Costa Rica
2016
El Salvador
2016
Guatemala
2016
Honduras
2016
Mexico
2016
Nicaragua
2016
Panama
2016
United States
2016
Venezuela
2016

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Terrestrial / Aquatic

Altricial / Precocial

Polygamous / Monogamous

Dimorphic (size) / Monomorphic

Active: Diurnal / Nocturnal

Social behavior: Solitary / Pack / Herd

Diet: Carnivore / Herbivore / Omnivore / Piscivorous / Insectivore

Migratory: Yes / No

Domesticated: Yes / No

Dangerous: Yes / No