Numbat

Termite-eating machines; and one of only two marsupials that are strictly diurnal

Helena Bella

Numbats are the sole member of its genus and the family Myrmecobiidae. Being threatened by habitat loss, predation by feral cats, and only a population of 1000, numbats are classified as Endangered by the IUCN, which has put the long-term future of this species and the whole family in danger jeopardy.

They are sometimes called banded anteaters as they have a striking pattern of white bands across the rusty orange and grey-black fur. Moreover, like anteaters, they also have an extremely long tongue that helps them pick up termites. Being diurnal, they spend their nights hiding in logs, tree hollows, or burrows.

Distribution

Country
Population est.
Status
Year
Comments
Australia
2015
Reintroduced: New South Wales
Australia
2015
Reintroduced: South Australia
Australia
2015
Western Australia

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Terrestrial / Aquatic

Altricial / Precocial

Polygamous / Monogamous

Dimorphic / Monomorphic

Active: Diurnal / Nocturnal

Diet: Carnivore / Herbivore / Omnivore / Piscivorous / Insectivore

Social behavior: Solitary / Pack / Herd

Migratory: Yes / No

Domesticated: Yes / No

Dangerous: Yes / No