Steller sea lion

They are able to hold their breath for as long as 40 minutes, and the deepest dive ever recorded is 424 m (140 ft)

The Steller sea lion is also known as the northern sea lion. Compared to other pinnipeds, they are only smaller in size than walrus and the two species of elephant seals. They have a tad lighter pelage in the shade than most sea lions, ranging from tawny to pale yellow and sometimes reddish. They are particularly agile on land since they can move their hind flippers independently.

They are carnivores and forage near the shore and in pelagic (oceanic) waters at night. They primarily prey on walleye pollock, Atka mackerel, Pacific salmon, and Pacific cod. Besides that, they also eat bivalves, squids, octopuses, gastropods, and some other species of seals.

Distribution

Country
Population est.
Status
Year
Comments
Pacific ocean
2016
Okhotsk Sea
2016
Beaufort Sea
2016
Okhotsk Sea
2016
Bering Sea
2016
Japan Sea
2016
Canada
2016
British Columbia
China
2016
Vagrant
Japan
2016
Korea
2016
Vagrant
North Korea
2016
Vagrant
Russia
24,138
Official estimate
NT
2016
Western Steller Sea Lion
United States
55,791
Official estimate
NT
2016
Western Steller Sea Lion

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Terrestrial / Aquatic

Altricial / Precocial

Polygamous / Monogamous

Dimorphic (size) / Monomorphic

Active: Diurnal / Nocturnal

Social behavior: Solitary / Pack / Herd

Diet: Carnivore / Herbivore / Omnivore / Piscivorous / Insectivore

Migratory: Yes / No

Domesticated: Yes / No

Dangerous: Yes / No